Global Gender Gap Report 2018 | World Economic Forum

Global Gender Gap Report 2018 Pdf

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  • Globally, the average (population-weighted) distance completed to parity is at 68.0%, which is a marginal improvement over last year. In other words, to date there is still a 32.0% average gender gap that remains to be closed. The directionally positive average trend registered this year is supported by improvements in 89 of the 144 countries covered both this year and last year.
  • Across the four subindexes, on average, the largest gender disparity is on Political Empowerment, which today maintains a gap of 77.1%. The Economic Participation and Opportunity gap is the second-largest at 41.9%, while the Educational Attainment and Health and Survival gaps are significantly lower at 4.4% and 4.6%, respectively. Among them, on average, only the Economic Participation and Opportunity gap has slightly reduced since last year.
  • When it comes to political and economic leadership, the world still has a long way to go. Across the 149 countries assessed, there are just 17 that currently have women as heads of state, while, on average, just 18% of ministers and 24% of parliamentarians globally are women. Similarly, women hold just 34% of managerial positions across the countries where data is available, and less than 7% in the four worst-performing countries (Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Pakistan). However, there are bright spots, where significant progress has been achieved. Full parity on this indicator is already a reality in five countries (Bahamas, Colombia, Jamaica, Lao PDR and Philippines); and in another 19 countries there are at least 40% of women in managerial positions.
  • In terms of broader economic power, gaps in control of financial assets and in time spent on unpaid tasks continue to preserve economic disparities between men and women. Women have as much access to financial services as men in just 60% of the countries and to land ownership in just 42% of the countries assessed.  Also, among the 29 countries for which data are available, women spend, on average, twice as much time on housework and other unpaid activities than men.
  • Although average progress on gender parity in education is relatively more advanced than in other aspects, there are still 44 countries where over 20% of women are illiterate. Similarly, near-parity in higher education enrolment rates often mask low participation of both men and women. On average, 65% of girls and 66% of boys have enrolled in secondary education globally, and just 39% of women and 34% of men are in college or university today. This fact calls for more ambitious goals to better develop human capital—for both women and men.
  • With the rapid changes underway in today’s labour markets, our analysis this year also took a look at gender gaps in Artificial Intelligence (AI), a critical in-demand skillset of the future. Based on collaboration with LinkedIn, we find that only 22% of AI professionals globally are female, compared to 78% who are male. This accounts for a gender gap of 72%, which has remained constant over the last years and does not at present indicate a positive future trend. The implications of this finding are wide-ranging and require urgent action. First, AI skills gender gaps may exacerbate gender gaps in economic participation and opportunity in the future as AI encompasses an increasingly in-demand skillset. Second, the AI skills gender gap implies that the use of this general-purpose technology across many fields is being developed without diverse talent, limiting its innovative and inclusive capacity. Third, low integration of women into AI talent pools—even in industries and geographies where the base of IT talent has a relatively high composition of women—indicates a significant missed opportunity in a professional domain where there is already insufficient supply of adequately qualified labour.
  • Projecting current trends into the future, the overall global gender gap will close in 108 years across the 106 countries covered since the first edition of the report. The most challenging gender gaps to close are the economic and political empowerment dimensions, which will take 202 and 107 years to close respectively. Although the economic opportunity gap has slightly reduced this year, the progress has been slow, especially in terms of participation of women in labour force, where the gender gap slightly reversed. In terms of political empowerment, the progress achieved over the past decade has started to reverse. Remarkably, gender parity in Western countries has slightly reduced, while the progress is ongoing, on average, elsewhere. The education–specific gender gap is on track to be reduced to parity within the next 14 years, slightly faster than last year’s estimation. The health gender gap—although slightly larger than it stood in 2006—is nearly closed globally, and fully closed in a third of the countries assessed.
  • The most gender-equal country to date is Iceland. It has closed over 85% of its overall gender gap. Iceland is followed by Norway (83.5%), Sweden and Finland (82.2%). Although dominated by Nordic countries, the top ten also features a Latin American country (Nicaragua, 5th), two Sub-Saharan African Countries (Rwanda, 6th, and Namibia, 10th) and a country from East Asia (Philippines (8th). The top ten is completed by New Zealand (7th) and Ireland (9th).
  • All eight geographical regions assessed in the report have achieved at least 60% gender parity, and two have progressed above 70%. Western Europe is, on average, the region with the highest level of gender parity (75.8%). North America (72.5%) is second and Latin America (70.8%) is third. They are followed by Eastern Europe and Central Asia (70.7%), East Asia and the Pacific (68.3%), Sub-Saharan Africa (66.3%), South Asia (65.8%) and the Middle East and North Africa (60.2%). This year the 149 countries covered by the report include five new entrants: Congo, DRC; Iraq, Oman, Sierra Leone and Togo. Sierra Leone is in 114th position while the other new entrants rank lower.
  • Similarly, if current rates were to be maintained in the future, the overall global gender gap will close in 61 years in Western Europe, 70 years in South Asia, 74 years in Latin America and the Caribbean, 135 years in Sub-Saharan Africa, 124 years in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, 153 years in the Middle East and North Africa, 171 years in East Asia and the Pacific, and 165 years in North America. While these estimates reflect the pace observed to date towards achieving gender parity, policy-makers and other stakeholders can fast-forward this process and should take stronger actions in the years to come. There is a strong imperative to do so, in terms of justice and greater social equality as well as the economic returns of a broader base of diverse human capital.

GLOBAL GENDER GAP REPORT 2018

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